Web Design Trends for 2017

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Web Design Trends for 2017

Is Your Site Employing Any of These Trends?

It's quite common among designers to believe that following trends is a crucial part of their job. Being constantly up-to-date is seen as mandatory. Many designers evaluate the work of others through a prism of trends - tagging something as #old can be seen as an insult, as if not fitting the most recent style would automatically make the whole project less valuable.

However, there are reasons to follow the trends. Visiting such websites as Awwwards, FWA or CSS design awards may inspire you and as a result, help you to venture outside of your design habits. You can learn about the new visual worlds, which you can then (consciously or not) integrate with your graphic language. Watching the work of others helps you to keep on improving your skills while being up-to-date when it comes to the latest technologies.

In the last year or two, it has become noticeable that many designers are trying to move away from simple and closed compositions. More and more open-styled, seemingly chaotic, “broken” and cut compositions are being created. The previously worshiped grid lost its importance and its rules were deliberately and consciously bent. Content started to be shifted, seemingly moved, its parts sometimes overlapped and intermingled.

A great role in this process is played by the evolution of Canvas and WebGL. Modern projects are often a bit confusing, less intuitive than the minimalist ones, but they make a really strong, lasting impression on users.

What else is waiting for us in web design in 2017? Check out the rest of the predictions.

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Hot Trend in Web Design

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Hot Trend in Web Design

1. The Proliferation of UI Patterns

One of the side effects of responsive design has meant that a lot of sites look similar. However, responsive design isn’t solely to blame. The rise of WordPress sites and the booming theme market also have a hand in it.

And some folks, such as Matthew Monbre, have copped to being guilty of following everyone else’s look with his company’s site.

But having a similar look isn’t necessarily a bad thing. That’s because we’ve changed the way we consume the web, which has resulted in a lot of common UI design patterns. Design patterns have matured and as such, there’s little in the way of innovation when it comes to UI patterns.

In other words, a checkout will still be a checkout and should function as such. Same with a login model. There’s no real reason to reinvent the wheel. UI patterns must guide users through a smooth experience.

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